--- UPDATE from July 20, 2020 ---

New studies on antiperspirants containing aluminium: unlikely to be impaired by aluminium

In 2014, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) prepared a health risk assessment for antiperspirants containing aluminium. The data situation at that time was contradictory. The institute had therefore drawn attention to the need for research on the subject. Now there are two new human studies that require a reassessment of aluminium in antiperspirants.

The result of the reassessment: The BfR states "According to current scientific knowledge, health impairments due to the regular use of antiperspirants containing aluminium are therefore unlikely. ... The contribution of aluminium-containing antiperspirants to the total exposure to aluminium is significantly lower than assumed before."

Read the entire BfR statement 030/2020 of July 20, 2020 in German here.

Is the use of antiperspirants containing aluminium hazardous to health?

The BfR states: "Antiperspirants containing aluminium chlorohydrate can be used daily, according to current scientific knowledge, a health risk for consumers is unlikely. This is the result of the BfR risk assessment based on a new human study on aluminium intake by antiperspirants."

Read the entire BfR comment in German here.

Is there a connection between antiperspirants containing aluminium and breast cancer?

The BfR states: "A causal connection between the intake of aluminium from antiperspirants and the development of breast cancer could not been scientifically proven so far. In studies on mice, no tumors were observed, even at high doses."

Further questions and answers about aluminium in food and consumer products

Is there a connection between aluminium and Alzheimer's?

The BfR states: "Various studies attempted to prove a connection between aluminium intake and Alzheimer's disease, but could not find any clear evidence. Based on current knowledge, such a connection is unlikely."

Further questions and answers about aluminium in food and consumer products

Are SweatStop® antiperspirants safe? 

SweatStop® antiperspirants are classified as safe and harmless to health. The proper application and warnings must be observed.

Cosmetics containing aluminium compounds are successfully used as antiperspirants globally and can be sold without any restrictions. Food contains aluminium naturally (e.g. potatoes) or as food additives. Internationally acknowledged institutes grade them as harmless. The EU cosmetics regulation within the EU cosmetics law, as well as the Departments of Health ensure the safety of the products. Moreover, all cosmetics succumb a comprehensive regulation with safety tests and valuations and also scientific analysis.

With its statement of July 20, 2020, the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) states: "Antiperspirants with aluminium chlorohydrate can be used daily, according to current scientific knowledge, a health risk for consumers is unlikely. This is the result of the BfR risk assessment based on a new human study on aluminium intake by antiperspirants." Read the entire BfR comment in German here.

The American Cancer Society and the German Cancer Research Centre moreover exclude an increased breast cancer risk when using cosmetics containing aluminium compounds. Furthermore, no relation between the disease Alzheimer’s and the usage of aluminium-containing products could be observed, the World Health Organization states in their Report No. 194 of its International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS).

Following acknowledged independent consumer institutes confirm the harmlessness of aluminium salt containing deodorants and antiperspirants and provide further information:

If you still want to dispense without antiperspirants containing aluminum, T-shirts against sweat stains, sweat pads or iontophoresis devices are available. SweatStop® IXAL Roll-on, for example, does not contain aluminum, but is based on an innovative active ingredient for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis. Here you can find our alternative range against sweating.

Aluminum absorption in the body - what should I put attention on?

Aluminum is found in many foods and consumer products. Aluminum can be found in food naturally (e.g. in potatoes) or as a component of food additives. Aluminum ions from food packaging or dishes can also be transferred to the food.

The BfR comments: "If aluminum foil, aluminum grill dishes or uncoated aluminum menu dishes and dishes are used improperly, a comparatively high aluminum intake can occur. This is avoidable for consumers. With regard to the increased solubility of aluminum under the influence of In particular, acid and salt should not come into contact with acidic or salty foods, ie aluminum foil should not be used to wrap acidic or salty foods, including sliced ​​apples, tomatoes, rhubarb, salted herring, marinated meat or cheese. For barbecuing, reusable trays, for example made of stainless steel, are preferred. Whitening toothpastes can also contribute to the total amount of aluminum taken in. By reducing the use of these products or dispensing with them, the aluminum intake can be reduced. "

According to the current state of knowledge, aluminum contents in the body that are too high can have negative effects on the nervous system, the kidneys and the bones.

Further questions and answers about aluminium in food and consumer products